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CSC In The News

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CSC in the News

School-based Program Helps Adolescents Cope With Asthma
Jean-Marie Bruzzese, Ph.D., assistant professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, spoke to Science Codex about a school-based intervention program designed for adolescents with asthma that significantly improves asthma management and quality of life for the students who participate, and reduces asthma morbidity. Click here to read more about the program. (December 8, 2010)

Study Shows New Test Using MRIs May Be Useful in Diagnosis of Autism
Adriana Di Martino, M.D., Leon Levy Research Assistant Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, spoke to WebMD about new findings that suggest researchers may be getting closer to developing a test to diagnose autism spectrum disorder using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Click here to read more. (December 2, 2010)

Dr. Ruth Nass Receives Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Award
Ruth Nass, M.D., Nancy Glickenhaus professor of Pediatric Neuropsychiatry; professor of Neurology, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and Pediatrics was recently profiled in the Child Neurology Society's newsletter for having received the first Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Award.  Click here to read the profile. (December 1, 2010)

Prescriptions for Stimulants, Painkillers Soaring Among Youth: Trend Mirrors Similar Increase in Misuse of These Powerful Medications, Study Authors Note
Jess P. Shatkin, M.P.H., M.D., assistant professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Pediatrics, spoke to US News and World Report, HealthDay about a new study on the increased prescribing rates of controlled medications for adolescents. Increased prescribing rates for controlled medications is not a new phenomenon, and many believe that some of it has to do with recent initiatives to make sure pain isn't undertreated. According to Dr. Shatkin, "We believe we've been underusing pain medicine and sedative-hypnotic medications because we have been so concerned about the potential for abuse." Click here to read more. (November 30, 2010)

Inside The Teenage Brain
Jess P. Shatkin, M.P.H., M.D., assistant professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Pediatrics, spoke to Parade Magazine about the teenage brain. In the past few years, research has shown that the teenage brain is still very much a work in progress and functions quite differently from an adult's and that continue to develop well into their 20s. At birth, our brains have an operating system loaded and primed for growth. A study of 145 kids and adolescents scanned every two years at the NIH has shown that there's another huge surge right before adolescence, followed by a process of "pruning" those connections in a kind of use-it-or-lose-it strategy. According to Dr. Shatkin, "If you're a chess player or an athlete, the areas of the brain responsible for those skills will continue to develop -- while other skills will fade away." To read the entire article, click here. (November 28, 2010)

Bellevue Psychiatrist Creates a Safe Place for Kids in Crisis
Dr. Jennifer Havens of Bellevue Hospital oversaw the creation of its new $1.1 million Children's Psychiatric Emergency Program and understands the complexity of treating children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders. Throughout her career she has worked to identify children in crisis and give them a place where they can feel safe and get help. HHC Today, the newsletter of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation, spoke to her about the new facility. Click here to read the full story. (November 24, 2010)

More US children have ADHD, about 1 in 10, CDC survey says; better awareness, screening cited
Howard Abikoff, Ph.D., the Pevaroff Cohn Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Director of our Institute for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity and Behavior Disorders, spoke to the Associated Press about a recent survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention regarding ADHD. "It sounds a little high," said Howard Abikoff, noting that the CDC study is based on parents saying that a health care provider told them their child had ADHD, but it's not known who the health-care provider was or how thorough the assessment was. Click here to read the full AP story and here to see the CDC’s report. (November 11, 2010)

African Children Overcome Suffering Through the Healing Arts
Tonic.com spoke to Sandy Diver, who started Invest in Children Africa, a charity that works with the arts to help war-affected children, giving them the freedom to express what they can't say in words. Diver's interest in using art to help children began with a partnership with CSC researchers and clinicians who did work on trauma. She was part of The Day Our World Changed: Children's Art of 9/11. To read more about Invest in Children click here. To read more about The Day Our World Changed, click here to read about its inception and here to read about its current incarnation. (November 5, 2010)

New Psych Unit For Youth To Open At Bellevue
Jennifer Havens, M.D., Associate Professor and Vice Chair of the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at NYU School of Medicine and Director and Chief of Service, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Bellevue Hospital Center, spoke to NY1 about the opening of the new Children's Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program at Bellevue.  Click here and here to see NY1's coverage of the event. (November 3, 2010)

Bellevue Hospital's new $1.1M unit to tackle growing epidemic with psychiatric unit for kids
The New York Daily News reports that facing a dramatic increase in children in crisis, Bellevue Hospital is opening a special round-the-clock psychiatric unit for kids. The $1.1 million Children's Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program will be dedicated today and staffed by child and adolescent psychiatrists, nurses and social workers by the end of the month."This is going to be a big improvement to the existing system," said Dr. Jennifer Havens, director of Bellevue's Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Click here to read the full Daily News story. (November 3, 2010)

Celeb Opening for Bellevue Psych Center
Crain's Health Pulse reported on the openning of Children's Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program (CPEP), "Bellevue Hospital Center is dedicating its $1.1 million, 3,400-square-foot Children's Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program facility today. The new unit is expected to accommodate 1,500 emergency patients up to 18 years of age. Actress Uma Thurman, a Bellevue volunteer, is due to cut the ribbon, likely attracting the paparazzi, a Bellevue spokesman confirms. 'We hope so, anyway,' he says. Funding for the unit comes from the Leon Lowenstein Foundation and the New York State Office of Mental Health."  The CPEP is part of the Department of Child and Adolecent Psychiatry at Bellevue Hospital Center, run by Jennifer Havens, M.D.  To read more about the CPEP opening, read the New York City Health and Hospitals Coporation press release here. (November 3, 2010)

Teens' Late Night Texting Leads to Sleep Deprivation and Anxiety
Richard Gallagher, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Director, of Special Projects, Institute for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity and Behavior Disorders, spoke to US News & World Report about a recent study linking late night texting to poor sleep. Dr. Gallagher said, "Parents need to take the perspective of what their own lives were like growing up." To read more click here. (November 2, 2010)

Understanding The Special Needs Landscape In NYC
Daniela Montalto, Ph.D., clinical assistant professor and clinical director of the Institute for Learning and Academic Achievement, spoke to New York Family about developmental milestones and when to consult the experts about a suspected issue. Click here to read the full article. (November 1, 2010)

Helping Our Patients with Learning Disabilities: Expert Interview with Daniela Montalto, Ph.D.
Daniela Montalto, Ph.D., Clinical Director of the Institute for Learning and Academic Achievement at the NYU Child Study Center and Clinical Assistant Professor, was interviewed by the Carlat Child Psychiatry Report which is a publication written primarily for child psychiatrists, but also includes information that is useful for parents and educators. Please click here to read the interview with Dr. Montalto. (October 27, 2010)

Brain Boosting Activities

Richard Gallagher, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychiatry, was quoted by The Kid's Doctor, saying that besides being fun, imaginative play lets kids experiment with role-playing, "Much like reading, make-believe lets kids practice things they might not actually be able to experience in real life."

(October 18, 2010)

Natalie Weder, M.D., Receives AACAP Robinson Cunningham Award for the Best Paper by a Resident
Natalie Weder, M.D., recieved the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) 2010 Robinson Cunningham Award for the Best Paper by a Resident.  AACAP's Robinson Cunningham Award for the Best Paper by a Resident is named after J. Franklin Robinson, M.D. and James M. Cunningham, M.D., two former AACAP Presidents who dedicated their lives to improving and expanding psychiatric services for children. This award recognizes an outstanding paper on some aspect of child and adolescent psychiatry started during residency and completed within three years of graduation.  Dr. Weder is a Leon Levy Research Assistant Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Post Doctoral Fellow in the Phyllis Green and Randolph Cōwen Institute for Pediatric Neuroscience here at the CSC.  Her award winning paper “MAOA Genotype, Maltreatment, and Aggressive Behavior: The Changing Impact of Genotype at Varying Levels of Trauma,” was published in Biological Psychiatry in 2009. (October 15, 2010)

Brain-Boosting Activities for Your Preschooler
Richard Gallagher, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychiatry explained to WebMD that studies show that hitting the books with your preschooler improves early literacy. It helps kids sharpen language and vocabulary, and sparks discussions with the parent that promote a better understanding. Click here to read more. (October 7, 2010)

Cyberbully Suicide
Rachel G. Klein, Ph.D., Fascitelli Family Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Director of the Anita Saltz Institute for Anxiety and Mood Disorders spoke to CBSNews.com about cyberbullying. "Texting is their main form of communication. [Kids] don't talk on the phone anymore. It's a key part of their lives," says Dr. Klein. It may be tempting to imagine kids don't intend to hurt each other, and that technology is solely at fault, but Klein doesn't let bullies off the hook that easy. "[Bullies] intend to be cruel. They are cruel and cowardly," she says. "What they may not always appreciate is the consequences." To read more, click here. (October 7, 2010)

Binge Drinking Still a Problem Among High School Students, Young Adults
Richard Gallagher, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychiatry, offered tips to ConsumerAffairs.com for parents concerned about their children's drinking. According to the findings from a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than a quarter of all high school students and adults ages 18 to 34 engaged in binge drinking during the past month. Click here to read more. (October 6, 2010)

Daily Connection: Learning a Foreign Language
Daniela Montalto, Ph.D., Clinical Assistant Professor and Clinical Director of the Institute for Learning and Academic Achievement, spoke to WNBC-TV about teaching toddlers a foreign language at a younger age. Dr. Montalto commented on the benefits of children learning a second language - she says, academically children who know a second language tend to be better readers and score higher on exams.  Click here to see the clip. (October 4, 2010)

Education Nation: Learning a Second Language
Daniela Montalto, Ph.D., Clinical Assistant Professor and Clinical Director of the Institute for Learning and Academic Achievement, was interviewed about children learning a second language on NBC’s the Today Show, discussing that “There is a certain window of time when children are more sensitive and open to learning a second language.” Click here to watch the clip. (September 29, 2010)

Share At Your Peril, Facebook Addicts
Alexandra L. Barzvi, Ph.D., Clinical Assistant Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, talked to the New York Post about the use of social media by teenagers. One can imagine what went through the mind of shoplifter Caroline Giuliani, too young to legally drink, as she posted "Help me!" pictures on MySpace, while drinking martinis. She probably didn't think. "So, I'm 16. I went to a party and posted a picture of my friend flashing her boobs – that's criminal,” said Dr. Barzvi, "A picture of someone like [Caroline] holding a beer could prevent you from going to college." (September 27, 2010)

Pediatricians Want to Restrict Ads for Tobacco, Booze, Viagra
Lori Evans, Ph.D., Clinical Assistant Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Director of Training in Psychology, spoke to HealthDay News about the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation that children’s exposure to alcohol marketing and advertisements for erectile dysfunction drugs and other prescription medications be limited. Dr. Evans agreed, We know the impact of advertising. That's why advertisers spend money on it. For kids, the images are so vivid and clear that it's a good thing to limit access." But, she added, "No matter how much we limit access, we still have to watch with our children because we need to know what they're seeing and hearing." To read more click here. (September 27, 2010)

Children’s Response Art to 9/11 is Part of Memorial Museum’s Collection
In the fall of 2001, the NYU Child Study Center embarked on an ambitious project to study children's artwork triggered by 9/11. The artworks culminated in a book by Harry Abrams called "The Day Our World Changed" and an exhibition that debuted at the Museum of the City of New York on the first anniversary of the attacks. This summer the CSC donated 56 of these pieces, created by children between the ages of 5 and 18, to the 9/11 Memorial Museum. To read more click here. (September 20, 2010)

Pros & Cons of Children in Sports
Marianne Engle, Ph.D., Clinical Assistant Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, was quoted by eHow, discussing how sports reduce anxiety and depression in children. According to Dr. Engle, sports instill a spirit of competition, teach children self-discipline, increase their self-esteem, and help them set--and accomplish--goals. Click here to read more. (September 17, 2010)

New Treatment Options Target Underlying Causes of Childhood Obsessive-Compulsive and Tourettes Disorders
Barbara J. Coffey, M.D., M.S., Associate Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry is a Guest Editor of the September 17 issue of Science Magazine. Dr. Coffey is co-author of the editorial, "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Tourette's Disorder: Where Are We Now?" Click here to read the editorial. (September 17, 2010)

Teen Depression
Melissa Nishawala, M.D., Assistant Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, discussed teen depression and its signs on with correspondent Richard Besser, M.D., on ABC's Good Morning America. Click here to watch the conversation. (September 14, 2010)

Poor Kids Tutu Busy To Just Play
The New York Post spoke to Dr. Lori Evans, Clinical Assistant Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, about the pressure some New York City parents are feeling to bulk up their toddler's ‘extracurriculars' to ensure their spot at a top preschool. "Society has changed. Now everything is scheduled, even play dates. Kids start organized sports so early, if a kid is interested in baseball at 10, they're years behind! I wouldn't expect a 5-year-old to say, 'I want to do this sport until I'm a teenager.' But they do," says Dr. Evans. (September 9, 2010)

I'm so homesick! Freshman Blues and Psychological Growth
F. Diane Barth, L.C.S.W., in her blog on Psychology Today’s website recommended Dr. Jess Shatkin’s article on the transition to college to help both parents and college freshman handle this new stage. Click here to read her blog piece. (September 4, 2010)

News about Depression in Children
Parenting.com continued the discussion about depression in preschoolers highlighted recently in the New York Times magazine piece citing NYU Child Study Center's Dr. Melissa Nishawala and her illustration of the difficulty in pinpointing depression in young children, "How many times have you heard, ‘They'll grow out of it' or ‘That's just how he is'?" Click here to read more of the Parenting.com discussion. (September 2, 2010)

ADD Symptoms in Young Children
LiveStrong.com used the resources available here at AboutOurKids.org to accurate information about children with ADHD. We recommend that interventions to reduce negative symptoms of ADHD should include various people in the child's life including family members, teachers, schools, physicians and mental health professionals. Click here to read more. (September 1, 2010)

Can Preschoolers Be Depressed?
Melissa Nishawala M.D., Assistant Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, spoke to the New York Times Magazine about the diagnosis of depression in preschoolers. "How many times have you heard, ‘They'll grow out of it' or ‘That's just how he is'?" (August 29, 2010)

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Can Help With ADHD
Richard Gallagher, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychiatry, spoke to US News & World Report Health about the benefits of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Dr. Gallagher is working on a randomized, controlled study that is trying to see if CBT can help children with thinking skills like managing time, keeping track of homework assignments, and planning ahead. (August 24, 2010)

Parents Who Clash More Likely to Spank Kids
Lori Evans, M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor and Director of Training in Psychology, discussed spanking on US News & World Report's website, pointing out that, "what's really surprising is that something we know isn't effective with kids is still so accepted and used." (August 23, 2010)

Eating Disorders, Addictions Tough to Treat in Teens
Andrea Vazzana, Ph.D., Clinical Assistant Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychiatry, spoke to Science Magazine about the difficulty of treating eating disorders and addictions in children and teens. (August 19, 2010)

Date Nights With Your Kids
Anita Gurian, Ph.D., Clinical Assistant Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, suggested on Studio 5 that individual time with children can encourage individuality, reduce favoritism, and curb sibling rivalry. (August 19, 2010)

Easing Back-to-School Fears
Alexandra L. Barzvi, Ph.D., Clinical Assistant Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, discussed back to school jitters on NBC's Today Show: "Anxiety is a normal response to stress.  Normal anxiety is transient. It comes and goes.  Children might be anxious for a few days." (August 17, 2010)

Erase Traumatic Memories (and Achieve Your Own “Eternal Sunshine”)
Joseph E. LeDoux, Ph.D., Henry and Lucy Moses Professor of Science, Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Neural Science and Psychology, spoke to Big Think about his research into memory formation, including his findings targeting and eliminating certain memories in rats. (August 4, 2010)

Will You Be a Good Mother? Stellar Moms Possess Five key Traits. Learn to Cultivate Them Before You have a Bun in the Oven
Daniela Montalto, Ph.D., Clinical Assistant Professor and Pediatric Neuropsychologist in the Institute for Learning and Academic Achievement, explained to Cosmopolitan that women who rein in their emotions before they freak have a leg up on being terrific moms. (July 27, 2010)

NYU’s Child and Adolescent Mental Health Studies Undergraduate Minor Receives Education Award at Annual Meeting
Our CAMS program, run by Jess Shatkin, M.D., M.P.H., was honored at ACOP's Annual Meeting this year in February.  ACOP's Summer 2010 Newsletter includes Dr. Shatkin's acceptance speech talking about the birth of CAMS and the amazing program that has been born over the last five years. (June 15, 2010)

How to Raise a Smart Baby
Christopher Lucas, M.D., Clinical Associate Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, was quoted by WebMD, talking about a child's development during the first five years of life. (July 9, 2010)

Mental Health Woes Plague 'Cyberbullies' and Their Victims
Richard Gallagher, Ph.D., Director of Special Projects in the Institute for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity and Behavior Disorders and Co-Director of the Selective Mutism Program, spoke to Business Week about cyberbullying and the results of a recent Finnish study showing that teens who "cyberbully" others via the Internet or cell phones are more likely to suffer from both physical and psychiatric troubles, and their victims are at heightened risk, too. (July 6, 2010)

All Joy and No Fun
Alexandra L. Barzvi, Ph.D., Clinical Assistant Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychiatry, spoke to New York Magazine about the anxiety of modern parenting and why parents may be less happy than parents of previous generations. (July 4, 2010)

Is Being Text Obsessed Good for Your Kids?
Lori Evans, Ph.D., Clinical Assistant Professor and Director of Training in Psychology, spoke to CNN American Morning about how a parent's constant connectedness - email and texting 24/7 - may negatively impact their children. (July 2, 2010)

Eating Disorders, Addictions Tough to Treat In Teens
Andrea Vazzana, Ph.D., Clinical Assistant Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, spoke to HealthDay News about the scarcity of effective treatments and the difficult path to recovery for children and teens with eating disorders and addictions. (July 1, 2010)

Rockin' Scientists: NYU Brain Researchers Put Down Their Data Sets, Then Get Down With Their Rock Band
Joseph LeDoux, Ph.D., Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, writes about playing in a rock band with his colleagues at NYU for Scientific American. (June 28, 2010)

Teen Kids News
Richard Gallagher, Ph.D., Director of Special Projects, Institute for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity and Behavior Disorders and Co-Director, Selective Mutism Program, spoke to Teen Kids News about the negative effects of smoking marijuana. (June 26, 2010)

Snakes on the Brain
Joseph LeDoux, Ph.D., Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, spoke to US News & World Report about an experiment where researchers convinced volunteers to bring a slithery serpent within centimeters of their heads while they lay trapped in a brain scanner, offering a glimpse into the courageous brain. (June 24, 2010)

100 Questions & Answers About Your Child's ADHD: Preschool to College, Second Edition
Ruth Nass, M.D., Director, Child Neurology Residency Training Program, has just released the second edition of her book, 100 Questions & Answers About Your Child's ADHD: Preschool to College, with Fern Leventhal, Ph.D. Completely revised and updated, it is a comprehensive, practical guide for parents of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). (June 10, 2010)

Kids With Lesbian Parents Do Just Fine

Andrew Roffman, L.C.S.W., Clinical Assistant Director, Family Studies Program, spoke to HealthDay News about the recent study finding that teenagers being raised by lesbian parents demonstrate higher psychological well-being than those being raised in traditional families.

(June 7, 2010)

Tips for Raising Children Who Understand the Value of Work
Kimberly Williams, Psy.D., Clinical Instructor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, spoke to UrbanBaby about how to raise productive, motivated children in an affluent world. (June 7, 2010)

The Connection Between Autism and Epilepsy

Dr. Ruth Nass, Professor of Child Neurology and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Director, Child Neurology Residency Training Program , appeared on Health Radio's Dr. DeSilva show to discuss Autism and the prevalence of epilepsy among children and adults with Autism.  Click here to listen to the show.

(May 17, 2010)

Growing Up Too Fast?

Kimberly Williams, Psy.D., Clinical Instructor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, spoke to the NY Daily News about the YouTube video of seven-year-old girls dancing to Beyonce's 'Single Ladies' in skimpy outfits.  Dr. Williams warns that children understand more than grownups realize about the provocative and sexual moves they're taught to make.

(May 14, 2010)

Effects on Child of Being Sole Plane Crash Survivor

Anthony Charuvastra, M.D., Leon Levy Research Assistant Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, appeared on ABC's Good Morning America to discuss the possible psychological effects on the 10-year-old Dutch boy who was the sole survival of the plane crash in Libya.  Dr. Charuvastra explained that this is "the same type of post traumatic stress disorder that can affect combat veterans experienced in the war zone."

(May 13, 2010)

TV May Increase Aggression In Toddlers

Richard Gallagher, Ph.D., Director of the Parenting Institute, discussed evidence from a recent study linking television viewing to aggression on The Kids Doctor.  Dr. Gallagher explained that, "TV is not a benign influence. It does have impact." And, while content may impact children, he pointed out that children's behaviors may also be affected by the "opportunities lost."

(May 12, 2010)

Antisocial Networking?

Lori Evans, Ph.D., Director of Training in Psychology, spoke to The New York Times about the Pew Research Center findings that half of teenagers send 50 or more text messages a day and one third send more than 100.  Dr. Evans addressed the lack of research on the effects of texting and new social medias on the social development of our children and adolescents.

(April 30, 2010)

Psychiatry Facing Challenges

Jess P. Shatkin, M.D., M.P.H., Director, Education and Training, spoke to the South Bend Tribune about the shortage of medical students deciding to go into psychiatry.

(April 19, 2010)

Teens and the Internet: How Much Is Too Much?
Eric Teitel, M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychiatry, spoke with Psychology Today about the dangers of spending too much time on the internet for teenagers. (April 6, 2010)

Does My Child Have ADHD?

Steven M.S. Kurtz, Ph.D., appeared on Today on NBC to discuss how to identify children with Attention Deficit Hyper Activity Disorder.

(March 31, 2010)

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