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CSC in the News

CSC In The News

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CSC in the News

Early Help May Improve Preemies` Behaviour
Dr. Lori Evans, director of Training in Psychology and deputy director of the Faculty Group Practice, spoke to Reuters.com about a recent study on the effects of parent training on the behavior of preemies. According to the study, giving parents of newborn premature babies some help in better understanding and interacting with their infants may make a difference in their children`s behavior by the time they are ready for school. Click here to read the Reuters’ story. (December 22, 2011)

New NIH Council of Councils members named
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) appointed Dr. Xavier Castellanos, director of the Phyllis Green and Randolph Cōwen Institute for Pediatric Neuroscience, to the NIH Council of Councils. The council was established to advise the NIH Director, including making recommendations on research that represents important areas of emerging scientific opportunities, rising public health challenges, or knowledge gaps that deserve special emphasis or would otherwise benefit from strategic planning and coordination. For more information click here. (December 19, 2011)

ADHD Not Just Among Children and Teens
Dr. Lenard A. Adler, professor of Psychiatry and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and director of the Combined Adult ADHD Program, was featured on local CBS stations around New York talking about adult ADHD. It's usually associated with grade school children and teens but it turns out millions of adults have ADHD. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a neurological condition, actually the second most common psychiatric disorder, after depression. Click here to see the CBS segment. (December 11, 2011)

Asthma Self-Management is Sub-Optimal in Urban Hispanic and African American/Black Early Adolescents with Uncontrolled Persistent Asthma
Lead by Dr. Jean-Marie Bruzzese, researchers at the CSC along with their collaborators recently published new research results in the Journal of Asthma. Their paper, “Asthma Self-Management is Sub-Optimal in Urban Hispanic and African American/Black Early Adolescents with Uncontrolled Persistent Asthma” documents that while patients as young as 11 are given responsibility to manage their own asthma, they do not self-manage appropriately which suggests they are being given the responsibility at too young an age. Read the full article here. (December 7, 2011)

Personality Is Reflected in the Brain's Intrinsic Functional Architecture
Congratulations to our researchers in the Phyllis Green and Randolph Cōwen Institute for Pediatric Neuroscience! Their paper, “Personality Is Reflected in the Brain’s Intrinsic Functional Architecture” was just published by PLoS One. The full paper can be accessed here. (November 30, 2011)

Ask the Expert
Dr. Barbara Coffey, Director of the Tics and Tourette's Clinical and Research Program, is interviewed in the "Ask the Expert" column in the National Tourette Syndrome Association's Quarterly Newsletter. She answers questions about Tourette's Syndrome and its co-morbidities. Read the full piece here. (November 29, 2011)

Sense of smell 'can be improved through training'
Donald A. Wilson, Ph.D., research professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and research scientist at the Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, recently published findings in Nature Neuroscience showing that the sense of smell can be improved. This study suggests possible ways to reverse the loss of smell due to aging or disease. Dr. Wilson's results garnered a lot of attention in the media including: Scientific AmericanBBC NewsFrench Tribune.com, and Medical News Today.

The article itself can be found here. (November 20, 2011)

Number of women on ADHD meds soars
Dr. Leonard Adler, professor of Psychiatry and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, spoke to Vitals on msnbc.com about a new report showing that while more boys are treated for ADHD than girls, among adults the numbers are reversed – more adult women take ADHD medication than adult men. Read more here. (November 16, 2011)

The Disadvantages of Dance Performance in Children
Livestong.com quoted AboutOurKids.org in a post about possible anxiety or panic that can arise when children are in dance performances. Click here to read more about some of the downsides that come with these types of activities. (November 14, 2011)

ADHD Brain Changes Appear to Persist Into Adulthood
HealthDay featured the new study published this month by Dr. Xavier Castellanos and his team at the CSC’s Phyllis Green and Randolph Cōwen Institute for Pediatric Neuroscience in the Archives of General Psychiatry on the differences in the brains of those with ADHD. The study was the result of a 33 year follow-up of children with ADHD. Click here to read the HealthDay piece and here to read the original article. (November 10, 2011)

Parenting: The difference between good touch and bad touch
Our local ABC News affiliate linked to our article on talking to children about physical and sexual abuse. They point out that one of the positive outcomes from the Penn State scandal is that it reminds parents how important it is to have these conversations with their children. The ABC News story can be found here and our article is here. (November 9, 2011)

Dr. Coffey on Doctor Radio’s Everyday Health - Audiocast
Listen to Dr. Barbara Coffey, director of our Tics and Tourette's Clinical and Research Program, talk about Tourette’s Syndrome and tic disorders on Doctor Radio’s Everyday Health here. (November 7, 2011)

Elizabeth Olsen Talks About CAMS on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon
Our Child and Adolescent Mental Health Studies Minor (CAMS) has made the big time! Click on this link to see Elizabeth Olsen talking about the CAMS class she is in, “Disruptive Behavior and Sociopathy in Children and Adolescents” on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon. (October 31, 2011)

Neuroscience Institute At NYU Langone Medical Center Convenes Third Annual Symposium
Our esteemed chair, Dr. Glenn Saxe, presented "Network Neuroscience of Traumatic Stress" at the Neuroscience Institute's annual Symposium. The symposium was featured in Medical News Today. Click here to read the full story. (October 27, 2011)

PBS’s “Women War & Peace” Features Children’s Art of 9/11
Tonight’s episode of Women War & Peace, “Peace Unveiled”, features children’s art of 9/11 from our book, The Day Our World Changed. Women War and Peace is a five-part series on PBS looking at the roles of women in war and peace by spotlighting the he stories of women in conflict zones from Bosnia to Afghanistan and Colombia to Liberia, placing women at the center of an urgent dialogue about conflict and security, and reframing our understanding of modern warfare. The full series is available here and more information about the children’s art of 9/11 can be found here. (October 25, 2011)

Med School Mental Health Faculty Try to Spark Undergrads' Interest
Our Child and Adolescent Mental Health Minor (CAMS) was featured in an article in Psychiatric News. Dr. Jess Shatkin, director of CAMS, explained that some students may go on to careers in the child mental health field, but the larger value of the program is the increased knowledge and insight it provides for future parents and future professionals of any stripe. Click here to read the full story. (October 21, 2011)

Teen Bullied into Plastic Surgery
Richard Gallagher, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychiatry, spoke to ABC's Nightline about ways for teenagers to overcome bullying as an alternative to plastic surgery. Click here to see the video. (October 11, 2011)

Parent Peer Pressure: A Dirty Pants Experience
Alexandra Barzvi, Ph.D., clinical assistant professor, spoke to ABCNews.com about Parent-to-parent peer pressure. Dr. Barzvi explains this is a growing trend and attributes the proliferation in part to social media. Click here to read the ful piece. (October 10, 2011)

Children’s and parents’ posttraumatic stress reactions after the 2004 tsunami
A recent research study published in Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry used the instrument "Child Stress Disorders Checklist" created by our Chair, Dr. Glenn Saxe, to assess acute stress disorder in PTSD in children. This study examined the association between parents' and children's posttraumatic stress reactions after the tsunami disaster in Southeast Asia in 2004. The study demonstrates that parental distress can endure and worsen the impact of a disaster in children. In assessments of trauma-related consequences and in therapeutic work with children clinicians need to expand the focus to include their parents and family. Click here for a full pdf of the article. (October 5, 2011)

Secrets of Smell: Different Nose Parts for Stinky, Sweet
Donald A. Wilson, Ph.D., Research Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, spoke to National Geographic about a new study on why people with Alzheimer's disease often lose their sense of smell early on in the course of the disease. According to the study, millions of receptors in the nose's smelling organ aren't scattered at random, but congregate in tiny hot spots that help the brain discern good smells from bad ones. Click here to read the article. (October 3, 2011)

What Do I Say if My Child Has ADHD?
Timothy L. Verduin, Ph.D., Clinical Director of the Institute for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity and Behavior Disorders is featured as part the Huffington Post's video series, "What Do I Say?" Dr. Verduin explains how parents can explain what ADHD is to their children who have been diagnosed with the disorder. Click here to see the video. (October 1, 2011)

An Eye-Opening Experience: New Mentorship Program Begins
Project Eye-to-Eye is an amazing mentoring program that pairs adolescents with ADHD or LD and younger children with learning disorders. Read an article here from The Wesleyan Argus about the new Wesleyan chapter started by a student who was first diagnosed at the CSC and found out about Eye-to-Eye through us. You can also learn more about Eye-to-Eye at www.projecteyetoeye.org. (September 12, 2011)

Art for Heart: Remembering 9/11
EdgeBoston.com featured Art for Heart: Remembering 9/11 which includes selections of artwork and messages from the NYU Child Study Center, the Art for Heart Program of the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation and Dear Hero and Notes of Hope collections, which have been acquired by the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. The book's proceeds are graciously provided to the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. Click here to read more. (September 11, 2011)

Parenting While Grieving
An article at CNN.com about parenting children who lost a parent on 9/11 included images from Art for Heart: Remembering 9/11, selections of artwork and messages from the NYU Child Study Center. About 3,000 children lost a parent on September 11. Click here to see the article. (September 9, 2011)

New Research Shows Health Education Improves Lives of Kids with Asthma
Dr. Jean-Marie Bruzzese and a group of researchers have published new findings regarding teens who suffer from asthma. Dr. Bruzzese and her colleagues found that teaching adolescents techniques for managing their asthma, in both group and individual sessions conducted at their schools, coupled with further education for the teens’ medical providers, helped teens have fewer symptoms, better quality of life and avoid the need for emergency care. Her work was published this month in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (June 2, 2011)

Nationwide Shortage of Adderall Generics
Lenard Adler, M.D., professor of Psychiatry and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, spoke to Crain's New York Business about the shortage of the generic version of Adderall XR which the U.S. Food and Drug Administration last week placed on its list of drugs in shortage. The shortage is largely due to production issues. Click here to read the whole story. (April 17, 2011)

FDA Panel Says No Support for Linking Food Dyes, Hyper Kids
F. Xavier Castellanos, M.D., the Brooke and Daniel Neidich Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and vice chair for Research here at the CSC, commented on the FDA's Food Advisory Committee vote that there is not enough evidence to conclude that artificial dyes used to color foods contribute to hyperactivity in children. "We're left with science that can't support a causal claim," says Dr. Castellanos. However, "these data [also] don't give us any confidence that we can say there's nothing to worry about here." Read the full story at MedPage Today. (March 31, 2011)

Talking About Tragedy
Richmond Virginia News cited AboutOurKids.org as the best resource for advice on how to help your child cope with events like the recent disasters in Japan: Earthquakes, tsunamis, nuclear reactor dangers - it's hard to wrap your head around such tragedies. Add the image of children experiencing such events, and it is more than this mother's heart can take. Click here to read the full piece. (March 15, 2011)

As Peer Pressure Increases, So Does Brain's Ability to Resist It
Dr. Richard Gallagher, associate professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychiatry, spoke to Vitabeat about a new research report demonstrating that adolescents' brain wiring gears up just as risky behavior approaches. Researchers studied 24 girls and 14 boys from diverse backgrounds to gain insight into the brain's wiring during adolescence, finding the most significant changes in a region linked to reward processing. Click here to read the piece and here to read the research results. (March 9, 2011)

An Incomplete Education, One Mother's Story
Mamaroneck parent Susan Hynes McCallion discusses her son Ian Hynes' dyslexia and treatment at the NYU Child Study Center in the Larchmont-Mamaroneck Patch. Read the full story here. (March 2, 2011)

Live Health Chat: Childhood Mental Illness
Bennett Leventhal, M.D., professor and vice chair, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry answered question about childhood mental illness on a live health chat with the Chicago Tribune. Click here to read the chat. (March 1, 2011)

Boy suspended for 'Kick me' sign
Richard Gallagher, Ph.D., associate professor, of child and adolescent psychiatry, was quoted in articles about a nine-year-old boy in New York who has received a two-day suspension from school because he stuck a "Kick me" sign on a classmate's back. The principal sent the boy's parents a letter informing them that the act constituted "engaging in bullying behaviour" and therefore "will result in a Principal's Suspension for a period of two days." Click here to read the New York Post piece and here to read the article from the Globe and Mail. (February 18, 2011)

The Enemy Within - Toddler Edition
Glenn Saxe, M.D., chair of child and adolescent psychiatry and director of the NYU Child Study Center, spoke to the Colbert Report for their satiric take on toddlers and the juvenile justice system. See the clip here. (February 14, 2011)

Web of Popularity, Achieved by Bullying
Richard Gallagher, Ph.D., associate professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, spoke to Tara Parker-Pope of the New York Times about new research suggesting that the road to high school popularity can be treacherous, and that students near the top of the social hierarchy are often both perpetrators and victims of aggressive behavior involving their peers. Dr. Gallagher said the research added to a growing body of scientific literature documenting the role that popularity plays in aggressive teasing and bullying behavior. Click here to read the Well blog post. (February 14, 2011)

Bullying May Accompany Drive to Be Popular
HeathDay News spoke to Richard Gallagher, Ph.D., associate professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, about a study published in the February issue of the American Sociological Review. According to the study, teens who are already popular but trying to become even more so are the most likely to bully other kids, new research suggests. The kids seem to think that antagonizing others will raise their own status in the eyes of their peers. Dr. Gallagher confirmed that this study confirms previous findings on bullying and popularity. Read more here. (February 8, 2011)

Wal-Mart Exploits Tweens - New Makeup Aimed at Eight Year Olds
The Daily Cardinal used the resources available here, at AboutOurKids.org, in their story about a new eco-friendly, all-natural "option" for tween girls curious about wearing makeup. The retailing superstar is not the first to capitalize on various market research findings that conclude young girls are concerned with appearing "hot." You can read the Daily Cardinal piece here and also see our article about how to raise girls with healthy self-esteem here. (February 2, 2011)

Ground Rules for the Interactive Child
Richard Gallagher, Ph.D., associate professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychiatry, spoke to Everyday Health about how can parents monitor children’s use of TV, the Internet, and interactive video games and guide them to the best content. Dr. Gallagher recommends that, “the computer, TV, and video games should be in a public place if that's possible.” Click here to read the full article. (January 23, 2011)

9 Steps to Managing Separation Anxiety
Richard Gallagher, Ph.D., associate professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychiatry, gave advice to Everyday Health about separation anxiety. According to Dr. Gallagher, "It's important for parents to recognize that it's typical. Parents can provide some indication that this is going to be okay, provide support, and then make the separation as short as possible." Learn more here. (January 23, 2011)

How to Break Up With Binky
Most kids will give up their pacifiers on their own between the ages of two and four, but some children refuse to put the pacifier away. According to Richard Gallagher, Ph.D., associate professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychiatry, the time to take away the pacifier varies depending on the child. Click here to learn more. (January 23, 2011)

Video Game 'Addiction' Tied to Depression, Anxiety in Kids
Richard Gallagher, Ph.D., associate professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, spoke to HealthDay News about a new study which reveals that Video game addiction among children and teens may lead to the development of psychological disorders such as depression. Dr. Gallagher explains, "Getting highly involved with video games can become addicting, and parents need to be cautious about how many hours kids play." To read more, click here. (January 18, 2011)

What Would Cause a Young Person to Snap?
Glenn Saxe, M.D., chair and director of the NYU Child Study Center, spoke to USA Today about suspected gunman Jared Lee Loughner and the manifestation of mental illness in people in their early twenties. Click here to read more. (January 10, 2011)

Benefits of Cell Phones for Kids
Anita Gurian, Ph.D., clinical assistant professor in the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, discussed the benefits on cell phones for children, including their use as a safety tool on Modern Mom Parenting. Click here to read more. (January 6, 2011)

CSC in the News Archives

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